Admin

About Us

Toshawnka Mahone - Clark Academy's Program Director

Toshawnka Mahone has been the Program Director of Clark Academy since July 2016.  She began her career as a math teacher at North Charleston High School and Military Magnet Academy.  She served as assistant principal at North Charleston High, West Ashley High and School for the Arts.  Ms. Mahone was the Associate Principal of Curriculum and Instruction before becoming principal of Northwoods Middle school in June of 2013.  Ms. Mahone holds a Bachelor’s in Mathematics from the College of Charleston and a Master’s in Secondary School Administration from Charleston Southern University. 

‚ÄčEarnest Houston - Clark Academy's Assistant Program Director

Earnest Houston started his educational career at Wando High School as a Student Concern Specialist. After two years of service at Wando High, he transitioned to Communities in Schools. There he took on the role of a Wise Guys facilitator for Haut Gap Middle school and St. Johns High School on John's Island for four years. Mr. Houston then became a history teacher at Berkeley High School for eight years. He was a member of Berkeley High School's Star Academy Program, that won the Silver Star Award, for dropout prevention. While at Berkeley High School, he coached varsity football and wrestling. Mr. Houston is currently the new Assistant Administrator at Septima P. Clark Academy. 


Septima Poinsette Clark (May 3, 1898 – December 15, 1987) was an American educator and civil rights activist. Clark developed the literacy and citizenship workshops that played an important role in the drive for voting rights and civil rights for African Americans in the Civil Rights Movement.[1] Septima Clark's work was commonly under appreciated by Southern male activists.[2] She became known as the "Queen mother" or "Grandmother" of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.[3] Martin Luther King, Jr. commonly referred to Clark as "The Mother of the Movement".[2] Clark's argument for her position in the Civil Rights Movement was one that claimed "knowledge could empower marginalized groups in ways that formal legal equality couldn't."  

(Wikipedia 2018)